faschionism: style and shit
. maintained by @saxifraga-x-urbium, @atia-ofthejulii, and @cannibaliza. blog is faschionism.wordpress
faschionism: style and shit
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randomproxy:

artnouveaustyle:

A crown made in arts & crafts/art nouveau style that was given to the winner of the free verse competition at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Made of silver, green enamel and velvet.  Produced in 1908 by Philip & Thomas Vaughton.Source

The neo-druids in the crowd will recognize the three lines above the inscription as the three rays of Awen, the Welsh concept of bardic inspiration, most famously illustrated by the three drops from Ceridwen’s cauldron that turned an ordinary boy into the mythic poet Taliesin.
The symbol itself was invented by a Welsh poet and proto-neo-druid named Iolo Morganwg in the late 1700s (it should be noted that he straight up fabricated a lot of stuff that many neo-druids still repeat as Ye Olde Ancient Wisdomme, but how can you not love a dude whose first name is literally #yolo)
randomproxy:

artnouveaustyle:

A crown made in arts & crafts/art nouveau style that was given to the winner of the free verse competition at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Made of silver, green enamel and velvet.  Produced in 1908 by Philip & Thomas Vaughton.Source

The neo-druids in the crowd will recognize the three lines above the inscription as the three rays of Awen, the Welsh concept of bardic inspiration, most famously illustrated by the three drops from Ceridwen’s cauldron that turned an ordinary boy into the mythic poet Taliesin.
The symbol itself was invented by a Welsh poet and proto-neo-druid named Iolo Morganwg in the late 1700s (it should be noted that he straight up fabricated a lot of stuff that many neo-druids still repeat as Ye Olde Ancient Wisdomme, but how can you not love a dude whose first name is literally #yolo)
randomproxy:

artnouveaustyle:

A crown made in arts & crafts/art nouveau style that was given to the winner of the free verse competition at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Made of silver, green enamel and velvet.  Produced in 1908 by Philip & Thomas Vaughton.Source

The neo-druids in the crowd will recognize the three lines above the inscription as the three rays of Awen, the Welsh concept of bardic inspiration, most famously illustrated by the three drops from Ceridwen’s cauldron that turned an ordinary boy into the mythic poet Taliesin.
The symbol itself was invented by a Welsh poet and proto-neo-druid named Iolo Morganwg in the late 1700s (it should be noted that he straight up fabricated a lot of stuff that many neo-druids still repeat as Ye Olde Ancient Wisdomme, but how can you not love a dude whose first name is literally #yolo)
randomproxy:

artnouveaustyle:

A crown made in arts & crafts/art nouveau style that was given to the winner of the free verse competition at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Made of silver, green enamel and velvet.  Produced in 1908 by Philip & Thomas Vaughton.Source

The neo-druids in the crowd will recognize the three lines above the inscription as the three rays of Awen, the Welsh concept of bardic inspiration, most famously illustrated by the three drops from Ceridwen’s cauldron that turned an ordinary boy into the mythic poet Taliesin.
The symbol itself was invented by a Welsh poet and proto-neo-druid named Iolo Morganwg in the late 1700s (it should be noted that he straight up fabricated a lot of stuff that many neo-druids still repeat as Ye Olde Ancient Wisdomme, but how can you not love a dude whose first name is literally #yolo)
randomproxy:

artnouveaustyle:

A crown made in arts & crafts/art nouveau style that was given to the winner of the free verse competition at the National Eisteddfod of Wales. Made of silver, green enamel and velvet.  Produced in 1908 by Philip & Thomas Vaughton.Source

The neo-druids in the crowd will recognize the three lines above the inscription as the three rays of Awen, the Welsh concept of bardic inspiration, most famously illustrated by the three drops from Ceridwen’s cauldron that turned an ordinary boy into the mythic poet Taliesin.
The symbol itself was invented by a Welsh poet and proto-neo-druid named Iolo Morganwg in the late 1700s (it should be noted that he straight up fabricated a lot of stuff that many neo-druids still repeat as Ye Olde Ancient Wisdomme, but how can you not love a dude whose first name is literally #yolo)
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princeoftwosnakes:

steampunktendencies:

Octopus WIG by Kirstie Williams
[ via  Tentacles ]

crow-king-crowned
princeoftwosnakes:

steampunktendencies:

Octopus WIG by Kirstie Williams
[ via  Tentacles ]

crow-king-crowned
princeoftwosnakes:

steampunktendencies:

Octopus WIG by Kirstie Williams
[ via  Tentacles ]

crow-king-crowned
princeoftwosnakes:

steampunktendencies:

Octopus WIG by Kirstie Williams
[ via  Tentacles ]

crow-king-crowned
princeoftwosnakes:

steampunktendencies:

Octopus WIG by Kirstie Williams
[ via  Tentacles ]

crow-king-crowned
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naijacurls:

Quick vintage updo
My hair style from last week—takes only five minutes to do and all I used were bobby pins. I filmed a tutorial for it and as soon as I started editing, I realised how blue the lighting was. Lesson learned: don’t try filming on a cloudy/rainy day. Sigh. Will re-film it though.
Also, this has been my go-to low manipulation style these last few weeks when I’m pressed on time or feel like doing something simple :-) 
naijacurls:

Quick vintage updo
My hair style from last week—takes only five minutes to do and all I used were bobby pins. I filmed a tutorial for it and as soon as I started editing, I realised how blue the lighting was. Lesson learned: don’t try filming on a cloudy/rainy day. Sigh. Will re-film it though.
Also, this has been my go-to low manipulation style these last few weeks when I’m pressed on time or feel like doing something simple :-) 
naijacurls:

Quick vintage updo
My hair style from last week—takes only five minutes to do and all I used were bobby pins. I filmed a tutorial for it and as soon as I started editing, I realised how blue the lighting was. Lesson learned: don’t try filming on a cloudy/rainy day. Sigh. Will re-film it though.
Also, this has been my go-to low manipulation style these last few weeks when I’m pressed on time or feel like doing something simple :-) 
naijacurls:

Quick vintage updo
My hair style from last week—takes only five minutes to do and all I used were bobby pins. I filmed a tutorial for it and as soon as I started editing, I realised how blue the lighting was. Lesson learned: don’t try filming on a cloudy/rainy day. Sigh. Will re-film it though.
Also, this has been my go-to low manipulation style these last few weeks when I’m pressed on time or feel like doing something simple :-) 
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fauns-of-tibur:

Linden Sidhe
fauns-of-tibur:

Linden Sidhe
fauns-of-tibur:

Linden Sidhe
fauns-of-tibur:

Linden Sidhe
fauns-of-tibur:

Linden Sidhe
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shortcuttothestars:

More post-apocalyptic by shortcuttothestars ’apparently Nazgûl live through the nuclear winter ??
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thegetty:

This Roman ring is over 1600 years old and still looking as impressive as ever.
Ring, A.D. 375 - 400, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
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thelingerieaddict:

Why Do Men Wear Corsets? 
Credits: Trio of men’s corsets by Dark Garden | Photo © Joel Aron & The Edward is a variation on the Beau Brummell, a tailored vest corset by Dark Garden. | Photo © Joel Aron
thelingerieaddict:

Why Do Men Wear Corsets? 
Credits: Trio of men’s corsets by Dark Garden | Photo © Joel Aron & The Edward is a variation on the Beau Brummell, a tailored vest corset by Dark Garden. | Photo © Joel Aron
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nothingbutthedreams:

mensfashionworld:

Balmain Fall/Winter 2014

Bless Balmain.
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somewhatvintage:

(via  Pinterest)
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fyninasosanya:

Nina as Rosaline in Love’s Labour’s Lost for The Royal Shakespeare Company in 2008.
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nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
nothingbutthedreams:

thescarletwindow:


The Art of Indianism

I was skimming through a few of my mother’s old cotton sarees recently, pieces she’s picked up from different parts of the country over a span of almost 20 years.
I was excitedly gushing over how pretty and unique they were, and that was when it struck me that we hardly see girls/women our generation in these gorgeous traditional ensembles anymore.
We’ve been so strongly influenced by the Zara, Forever21, Mango, etc wave that’s hit our country, that we’ve almost lost our own ethnic style somewhere in that chaos.
 I’m not a fashion extremist. I personally love these brands that I just mentioned. But I also love the gorgeous traditional styles we’ve had around us for centuries. So many colours, such vibrant gorgeous prints, and breathtaking jewellery!
 I immediately feverishly started googling Indian fashion blogs to see if there were bloggers who’d made an attempt to incorporate any ethnic elements into the looks they blog about. Unfortunately, I found no one.
 The Scarlet Window, was hence conceived out of an eager desire to revive our native styles, and fuse it with the new-age trends to created wearable, contemporary Indian looks.

These are so lovely.
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omgthatdress:

Evening Headdress
1850s
The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
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kahtiihma:

blackbanshee:

pyroluminescence:

motherofcosplay:

Ever have trouble finding boots in the right color? Tried spray-painting them and ended up with a dry, cracked mess?A fantastic friend recently advised me to paint leather boots (and any other leather goods) with floral paint. This is a spray paint that is light and flexible enough to use on live flowers. Above are the Poison Ivy boots I painted for a friend, which turned out fantastic.
One thing though: Wear them while you paint them, and maybe stretch your foot around in between coats. I didn’t think of this, and while the paint did not crack at all, it started to split where the boots were stretched from walking. Next time I paint some boots, I’ll let you know if I was able to fix this problem.
The paint I used is called Design Master, and you can find it at Michael’s or Joann Fabrics. In the stores near me, Michael’s had a better selection of colors and a slightly better price, but that may not be true everywhere. This color is “Holiday Green.”

Great alternative to spray rubber and plasti-dip or bootcovers, and cheaper than leather paint! Reminder that Michaels and JoAnns both frequently offer 50% off coupons and will match competitor coupons and offers!!

yooo i used this stuff on my ball gown shoes a while back and it worked perfectly. also if you rub pure acetone on your shoe before you paint it, it will rub off the leather/pleather etc sealant and absorb the paint even better, lessening your chances of the paint splitting in some areas. also spraying it with water proof sealant for shoes will help out a great deal as well!


this stuff is AMAZING it only took one coat to evenly color my boots in the perfect color!! It’s a little expensive for paint but it’s way cheaper than finding shoes or other leatherwear in the “perfect” color, and this way you can choose the preferred style and color as needed!!
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untitled-1991:

altuzarra ss 15
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quorgi:

GIVE THEM TO MEEEEEEE
quorgi:

GIVE THEM TO MEEEEEEE
quorgi:

GIVE THEM TO MEEEEEEE
quorgi:

GIVE THEM TO MEEEEEEE